All Posts By

Christopher Chase

Red Wine

From the South – April 2017

By | From the South | No Comments

In many ways, this year has been about seeking clarity in the way we as a Lodge do business. We’ve changed our accounting practices to be more transparent and modern. We’ve clarified our Masonic education and actually made it a centerpiece for our stated meetings. We’ve sought greater clarity and brotherhood inside our Lodge through these educational pieces. We’ve even begun clearing up some of our old “handshake” agreements and ad-hoc practices for the sake of clarity, unity, and brotherhood. Read More

From the South – February 2016

By | From the South | No Comments

At our January stated meeting, I heard the words of the Junior Warden’s closing charge as I’ve heard them many times. But this time, a particular sentence stuck out to me:

“You have been enjoined to remind a Brother in the most friendly manner of his fault, to endeavor to aid his reformation, and to defend his character.”

How does one achieve this? How can one aid in the reformation of a Brother’s faults, or defend his character when we disagree with him? Read More

From the South – January 2017

By | From the South | No Comments

First of all, happy New Year, brethren! I hope your holidays were filled with family, friends, and happy memories. I look forward to the work we have ahead of us in Friendship Lodge this year, and welcome the opportunity to learn and grow with you all.

As I stepped into the Junior Warden’s shoes for the first time at the installation, I felt much as I did almost exactly a year before in the Senior Deacon’s role for the first time. A little overwhelmed and feeling more than a little underprepared, to say the least. In the moment, I could only think about how I didn’t know the first thing about being a Junior Warden.

But looking back at my first time fulfilling the duties of the Senior Deacon, at how unsure and overwhelmed I felt at that time, I remember the wise words: “Anything worth being good at is worth being bad at, at first.”

As we’ve all heard many times, we begin in our “rude and imperfect state.” Our aim here is to refine and perfect our shortcomings, and this requires sometimes uncomfortable and difficult work. But the end product is worth the work, the embarrassment, the uncertainty; a smooth ashlar, a better fit for that “house not made with hands.”

Be well, and keep working,

Chris Chase, Junior Warden